Romantic sunrise with the crabs

Sunrise in the mangroves is a dream! I've learnt so much about them over the past few weeks and it's amazing sitting here watching all the burrowing crabs emerge from their burrows and sassily throw sand around!As soon as I move, all the crabs return to their burrows, so I have no photos... but now …

Mismatch of Legs

Recently I was sorting through all the specimens which either had no name, or were mixed in with other species so their individual identity was unknown. I came across this relatively small box of 12 specimens. As you can imagine, they were piled into the box, with legs and claws everywhere! To say the least …

Faux Florida

  Cancer incisus Leach, 1814 These specimens, with the name Xantho florida written on their boxes, were probably of biggest surprise to me, not due to their appearance or their beauty (although as with all of these specimens- they are beautiful!). It was the name that concerned me. I had 4 records of this species …

Heart Shaped Predator

Phyllolithodes papillosus Brandt, 1848 Apart from the obvious delicacy and beauty of this specimen, which overwhelmed me when I first saw it, it was actually the 'u' shaped depression in the middle of the dorsal side of this specimen that caught my eye. It looks spectacular and, now that the specimen is bleached of it's …

WWII and the introduction of Barnacles

I came across a group of specimens in a box, with a starry label on the glass reading 'Little Grebe'. As a Grebe is a type of bird, I was slightly confused by this. I decided to look into whether this was relating to the specimen, and found a piece of paper in the box …

Barnacles and sponges

Barnacles are also part of the Crustacea subphylum. The only time I have been exposed to and/or looked into the detail of barnacles was on a Marine Biology field course to Millport, Scotland in June 2012. I studied the Chthalmus genus of barnacle, and their orientation to the coast. Below is a photograph I took …

Chelicerata Vs. Crustacea

The horseshoe crab, scientific name Limulus polyphemus (Linnaeus, 1758), is part of the chelicerata subphylum not the crustacea. There is a species of this amongst the crustacean the collection here at the Manchester Museum, which is what lead me to research more into this subphylum. Differences which set chelicerata apart from crustaceans include chelicerata having …