Mismatch of Legs

Recently I was sorting through all the specimens which either had no name, or were mixed in with other species so their individual identity was unknown. I came across this relatively small box of 12 specimens. As you can imagine, they were piled into the box, with legs and claws everywhere! To say the least…

Faux Florida

  Cancer incisus Leach, 1814 These specimens, with the name Xantho florida written on their boxes, were probably of biggest surprise to me, not due to their appearance or their beauty (although as with all of these specimens- they are beautiful!). It was the name that concerned me. I had 4 records of this species…

Heart Shaped Predator

Phyllolithodes papillosus Brandt, 1848 Apart from the obvious delicacy and beauty of this specimen, which overwhelmed me when I first saw it, it was actually the ‘u’ shaped depression in the middle of the dorsal side of this specimen that caught my eye. It looks spectacular and, now that the specimen is bleached of it’s…

Barnacles and sponges

Barnacles are also part of the Crustacea subphylum. The only time I have been exposed to and/or looked into the detail of barnacles was on a Marine Biology field course to Millport, Scotland in June 2012. I studied the Chthalmus genus of barnacle, and their orientation to the coast. Below is a photograph I took…

Full Time Placement!

Hi, long time no see I know! I’m back now and am starting a full time placement in the Entomology department at the Manchester Museum, where I will be completing my work on the Crustacea collection. To kickstart the blogging momentum (it seems so hard to get going but once I’m posting I can’t stop!),…

The Importance of Museums to Zoologists

Hi!¬†Been very busy recently so a big sorry for not posting for a while, I have been working on a short film to promote the Manchester Museum, and show the work I do behind the scenes as a museum volunteer. I aim to show Zoologists¬†like me how important the museum is to their education. The…